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Recruitment agency - why not?

Published on 24.08.2016

Are you looking for a new job? Then a recruitment agency can help you in two ways:

  • A recruiter may contact you himself/herself because he or she has found your resume or profile and because the recruiter thinks you are qualified for a particular job.

  • You may contact the recruitment agency yourself. You can apply for a particular job or submit an open application. The recruitment agency can look to see if you qualify for any upcoming positions.

Below you can read a little bit more about the other positive sides of working with an agency. Recruitment agencies provide the following benefits for applicants:

  • Recruitment agencies are free of charge for candidates. Recruitment Agencies are working on request and are paid by their clients (other companies). Therefore, there are no costs for you as a candidate. You are getting help for free!

  • Recruitment agencies have an excellent knowledge of the labour market. They know which sectors and companies are forming exciting opportunities for people with your knowledge and expertise, and which expectations are realistic.

  • Recruitment agencies have a large network. Therefore they can often quickly get you in contact with interesting clients and projects. Besides, they can offer you way more options than you can find by yourself.

  • Recruitment agencies have access to jobs that you as a job seeker often cannot see (yet). Through many years of partnership with clients, agencies are the first to hear about profiles that are needed. And of course, they are the first to fill the positions before they even get to the job websites.

  • Recruitment agencies are following up your application. You will receive feedback and/or will be assisted from intake interview to salary negotiation. Your recruiter wants you to get the job. This is the reason why he/she will help you prepare for the interview, will guide you through the whole process, and of course - will stand up for you in front of the client. In short - you have one more person on your side!

  • You will enjoy the security of a permanent contract and the variety of different projects. You applied for a position, but the client closed it or liked another candidate. Well, once your recruiter knows what you can do and what you want to do, he/she will help you find another option that will fit you.

Still having some doubts whether recruitment agency is the right way to go? Best you can do is give it a try. And yes, we know you will be satisfied after that.





Source: https://www.pauwelsconsulting.com/job-application-tips/the-benefits-of-using-recruitment-agencies-for-your-job-search/
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"HRS Academy" - 4th edition

Published on 05.11.2015

HRS Bulgaria organizes forth edition of the initiative “HRS Academy”. The goal of the academy is to support the career development of young professionals, who are looking for a new employment. “HRS Academy” is planned to improve the candidates’ language skills in German, French or English languages. The language classes are prepared and delivered from the experienced teachers from “Language Garden”, who have prepared an interactive educational program to support the students’ future career. Except of the intensive language classes, the program includes classes to prepare the students for the competition in the labor market – how to prepare for an interview, how to write a CV and a career consultation with the HR specialists from the HRS Bulgaria team.

In August was organized the first edition of “HRS Academy”, who ended successfully for a big part of the students. They succeeded to start a new job in some of the biggest international companies in the area of logistics, accounting and customer service. The third edition was bigger and now all the students are going through the interview process with our clients, feeling confident and prepared for the whole process.

The new edition of the “HRS Academy” with courses in German, French and English starts on the 16th November. If you want to join the courses, send your CV to the following e-mail: blagorodna.miladinova@hrs-bg.com until 10th November.
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HRS Bulgaria organizes

Published on 07.10.2015

HRS Bulgaria organizes a second edition of the initiative “HRS Academy”. The goal of the academy is to support the career development of young professionals, who are looking for a new employment. “HRS Academy” is planned to improve the candidates’ language skills in German, French or English languages. Except of the intensive language classes, the program includes classes to prepare them for the competition in the labor market – how to prepare for an interview, how to write a CV and a career consultation with the HR specialists from the HRS Bulgaria team. The language classes are prepared and delivered from experienced teachers, who have prepared an interactive educational program to support the students’ future career.

In August was organized the first edition of “HRS Academy”, who ended successfully for a big part of the students. They succeeded to start a new job in some of the biggest international companies in the area of logistics, accounting and customer service.

The new edition of the “HRS Academy” with courses in German, French and English starts on the 19th October. If you want to join the courses, send your CV to jobs@hrs-bg.com until 11th October.


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7 Ways to Become Happier and More Productive at Work

Published on 03.07.2015

Do you enjoy your job? Are you truly passionate about what you do? Do you genuinely like your colleagues?

Chances are, you like some aspects of your job more than others. As Steve Crabtree reports in his Gallup article “Worldwide, 13% of Employees Are Engaged at Work,” in 2013, 24 percent of workers were unhappy at work and over 60 percent lacked motivation.

Interestingly, according to a study titled “Happiness and Productivity” conducted by Andrew J. Oswald, Eugenio Proto, and Daniel Sgroi at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, being happy at work makes people approximately 12 percent more productive. The researchers found that happier workers managed their time more effectively, which allowed them to work at a higher pace while still maintaining the quality of their performance.

Considering that being more productive can lead to job growth and career advancement, it’s only logical to want to increase your professional happiness level. But since you can’t magically change your professional duties, work environment, or colleagues, you have to take action to change the things you can control. The following seven tips can help you become happier and more productive at work.

    1. Compartmentalize. Granted, it’s easier said than done, but checking your personal worries at the office door is an important step to being happier at work. No matter what’s going on in your personal life, during work hours, you can’t do anything about it. Plus, you owe it to your employer to be 100 percent present. So every time you find yourself worrying about something at home, take a deep breath, and refocus on the task at hand.

    2. Smile! In the Psychology Today article titled “Smile: A Powerful Tool,” Alex Korb, Ph.D., explains that the physical act of smiling provides the brain with neural feedback that convinces you you’re happy. At the same time, when you smile, people around you are more likely to be friendly and positive. All in all, simply lifting the corners of your mouth can make you feel better and create a more upbeat atmosphere at work!

    3. Find a sense of meaning in your job. According to John Rampton’s Time article “15 Tips for Being Happy at Work,” research shows that workers who understand how their work has a positive impact are both happier and more productive. So take a moment to determine how what you do makes a difference.

    4. Work on your professional development.
One of the best ways to improve your outlook is to actively work towards professional growth. Whether it’s asking for stretch assignments, following professional development courses, or studying for a degree, knowing that you’re investing in your own progress will likely make you more positive and productive.

    5. Be organized. A cluttered desk and not knowing how to prioritize can leave you feeling drained and disoriented. Every morning, make a point of de-cluttering your workspace and listing out your tasks for the day. As you complete each task, cross it off the list. This will give you a feeling of accomplishment.

    6. Focus on one task at a time. Multitasking isn’t always the best approach when you need to deliver quality work. Instead of trying to type a report while you’re on a call with a client, give each task your undivided attention. This will reduce the number of mistakes you make and enable you to perform your best work. And that in turn is likely to result in positive feedback from your supervisor and colleagues.

    7. Don’t over commit yourself.
In her About Money article titled “Top 10 Ways to Be Happy at Work,” Susan M. Heathfield advises against taking on commitments you won’t be able to meet. Failing to deliver causes a lot of stress and anxiety, which in turn has a negative effect on the next task you need to complete. So be realistic when accepting assignments and agreeing to deadlines. It’s better to take more time to do something well than to disappoint.

Becoming happier and more productive at work is just as much about having the right attitude as it is about taking action. Use the tips above to take control, and find out how your mood and performance both improve!

Source: Article - Help employees become happier and more productive at work; from https://www.kellyservices.us


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Successful Candidates Never Ask This Question

Published on 04.02.2015

Few words kill your chance of landing the plum job faster than these questions:

"What does your company really do?"
If you have to ask this question, you are not prepared. You wouldn't like it if an interviewer didn't do their homework before speaking with you, so why would you not extend the same courtesy? No matter the role you're interviewing for, you should be familiar with the company and what they do. It's your job to approach the interview excited to explain how your unique skills will help the team achieve it.

"How many hours would I be expected to work?"
This question says a lot about a candidate's priorities. The interview is your place to shine and show why you're the best person for the role. Since the most successful workers are great at time management, you should be confident that you can prioritize to get the job done. Asking how much you're expected to work implies that you're only interested in doing the bare minimum.

"When would I get a raise?"
This is another revealing question. Those who ask this show that money is their primary motivator. Employees earn raises through working harder than their peers and being strong team players. The best candidates know this and are willing to work for advancement. They don't expect it outright -- or ask about it in interviews.

You do not have that many opportunities in your career to leapfrog forward. When the perfect job surfaces, it's up to you to seize it.

The best candidates know how to identify roles that will be a perfect fit for their skills and interests. If you're lucky enough to find one, do your homework and focus on what really matters. Dig in deep to find out how you would contribute, because the the best candidates know that achieving a shared sense of mission beats smaller, selfish goals.

Great businesses are powered by great employees. Terrific hiring managers know this. They invest in people who are intrinsically motivated and put the organization first. Understand this, interview well, and prosper.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/successful-candidates-never-ask-question-brian-de-haaff (written by Brian de Haaff)
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How Typos Can Kill Your Resume

Published on 28.01.2015

You may have recently read opinions on whether resume typos or grammatical errors will disqualify you for a job. Some articles suggest that one or two errors are okay; other articles tell you just one error will kill your chances at landing the job. Did you know that recruiters read your resume in 10 seconds or less? Should your first impression be a typo or grammatical error? You may be letting them form a negative opinion about the quality of your work, your ethics, and overall skill set.

Consider the message you are sending when you submit a resume without proofreading it. You could be telling a potential employer that:

1. You don't care
2. You don't pay attention to detail
3. You don't know how to use spell check.
4. You have grammar challenges
5. You could make the same errors with a client or customer


According to a recent poll by Robert Half, 82% of senior managers said two or more resume mistakes would eliminate an applicant from consideration for a job. While that leaves 17% of managers who will tolerate one resume error, why take a chance this group will read your resume and look past the error?

How to increase your chances of submitting a resume without errors:

1. Read your resume out loud while standing. 
2. Walk away from your resume for at least an hour, repeat #1.
3. Have someone else read your final resume and give feedback.
4. Use Google docs to write your resume - it has an auto spell check.
5. When using MS Word, ensure spell check is turned before you begin writing your resume. To learn how, click here.

Remember, the job search requires a strategy to be effective. Part of that strategy includes proofreading your resume before submitting it for a job.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-typos-can-kill-your-resume-holly-bunn
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6 Ways to Be More Likable in an Interview

Published on 21.01.2015

Here are some do’s and don’ts for being a likable candidate:

1. Be respectful when offering your critique. 

For example, you might be asked to look at a company’s website and offer your opinion about it. If you hate how the site looks and feels, remember that the person who asked the question may be he one who designed the website. Instead of saying, “your site is terrible,” you might say instead, “I can see what you are trying to do here, but there are some things I could focus on to improve it.”

2. Show up on time.

Think of your interview as a time when you model the behavior you will exhibit after you are hired. No boss wants to be ready for a meeting and have key people keep him or her waiting to begin.As a sign of respect, you must honor your commitment to be at every business meeting without wasting other people’s time. If you are driving to an interview and aren’t familiar with exactly where you are going, it is wise to make a dry run the day before to see traffic patterns and how long it will take you to get there.

3. Show up prepared. 

It is always a good idea when you are setting up an in-person interview to proactively ask the person who is inviting you into the company what topics will be covered and what materials the person or panel would want to see.Say you will be giving a presentation. Make certain that if you bring it on a laptop or thumb drive, you save it in multiple formats (such as PowerPoint and PDF), in case there is a computer glitch.

4. Avoid overconfidence. 

Well seasoned human resources staff and recruiters are experts at making you feel welcome and comfortable. They may say some flattering things as a part of their job of assembling a pool of highly interested and motivated candidates. And, truth be told, they likely are impressed with you, or else you wouldn’t be invited for the interview.

Don’t assume from any of this that you are a lock for the job. Friendliness and compliments do not constitute a job offer, and other candidates are probably receiving similar messages. So, don’t be lulled into complacency. The people interviewing you should be friendly, but they aren’t your friends yet.

5. Make friends with the receptionist.

The people who greet you at the door and usher you to a seat while you are waiting to be called into your interview are often quizzed about your words and behavior with them. Avoid saying anything to them you wouldn’t want the CEO to hear. Your interview begins when you push the door open to the office, and it's important to act professionally at every moment.

6. Speak with your interviewers, not at them.

Remember that your interview is a structured conversation. While you may have a whole song and dance prepared and messages you are convinced you must convey, slow down and listen. People can easily tell when you are spouting out a canned response to a question. Moreover, they get annoyed when you are off point in your responses to their questions.


Source: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/01/06/6-ways-to-be-more-likable-in-an-interview

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10 Newbie Job Seeker Fails

Published on 14.01.2015

You will face many situations as you search for your next job, and as you'll see below, one of the worst things you can do is opt out of opportunities. Here are 10 newbie mistakes you should avoid:

1. You don’t get enough information about a networking contact before reaching out. You would probably feel more comfortable and confident reaching out to a referral contact if you knew something about them. Your success in securing a meeting with someone you don’t know will improve if your request explains why you want to meet.

The better option: When you receive the name of a referral or someone you should speak with, ask why. Find out how long your contact has known this person, in what context, and why it would be mutually beneficial.

2. You won’t talk to third-party recruiters, contract houses or temp agencies, because you think they're rip-offs. This is a bad idea for many reasons. Did you know that some jobs are only filled by recruiters? It depends on the company and the types of roles, but you don’t want to miss out on an opportunity. And did you also know that contract and temporary jobs can often lead to regular employment?

The better option: Be discerning when evaluating the potential job that a third-party recruiter presents to you. Ask the recruiter what they know about the company and the job, if they have placed people within the company before and what role the recruiter will play during the interview process.

3. You refuse to get on LinkedIn because of privacy issues. LinkedIn is a popular recruiting tool used by small and large companies across many industries. If you choose to opt out based on personal preferences or misinformation, you may hinder your job search.

The better option: Learn how to fill out your LinkedIn profile and about privacy settings. You can read articles, talk to others who are using it or even hire someone to help you create your profile. Consider your profile your online resume, although it is capable of so much more.

4. You refuse to take an interview, because the commute to it is too long. Prejudging a job opportunity based solely on its distance from your home is ill-advised. Do you know if the company allows telecommuting? If you didn’t have to commute daily, would that change your decision?

The better option: Go to the interview, and learn about the job. What do you have to lose? Ask how many employees work remotely. If the company doesn’t support the idea, don’t give up hope. Once you’ve received the offer, you may be able to negotiate the number of days you are in the office.

5. After numerous weeks of unemployment, you turn down a job because it's “below” you. Is it damaging to your career to take a lower-level job? Not always. In fact, future employers may even admire your determination and work ethic. What may be more damaging to your job search is your extended period of unemployment.

The better option: Carefully weigh the pros and cons, and consider how you will explain why it's taking so long for you to find a job. This is a complex situation and difficult to answer broadly. There may come a time when it makes sense for you to take a lower-level job.

6. You refuse to fill out any online application that asks for Social Security number. Every job seeker should be concerned with identity theft and practice safe online practices. However, there are still companies out there that ask for a Social Security number on the online or paper application.

The better option: Instead of assuming the job is a scam or that the company will abuse your private information, call human resources, and speak with someone. There may be a workaround.

7. You turn down the second interview, because the first interviewer was a jerk. Ending the interview process too soon, based on early assessments, may not provide an accurate evaluation. Perhaps your interviewer was having a bad day. You probably haven’t learned enough about the company, the people you will be working with or the job to make the most informed decision.

The better option: Smile, learn what you can from the interviewer and enthusiastically accept a second interview so you can accurately assess your fit within the organization.

8. You forget to ask the time frame for making the hiring decision. If you don’t know what the next steps in the hiring process are and what the company timeline is for filling the job, how will you know when to follow up? Emergencies, vacations and budgets can cause timelines to slip, so don’t assume no news is bad news.

The better option: Immediately contact the person you interviewed with, preferably via phone, and ask about the process and time frame. Also ask if it would be OK for you to follow up if you haven’t heard from the interviewer within that timeline.

9. You follow up after the interview by showing up at the business location. Being eager is one thing. Coming across as desperate or lacking professionalism is another. Unless you have been invited to stop by anytime, making an appearance at the company could send the wrong impression.

The better option: Show your interest and persistence by following up with a professional thank-you note. Use the information you gained by asking about the hiring process to gauge future follow-up best practices.

10. You insist on making the same salary you made at your last job. Many factors impact your value in the workplace – only one of which is your previous salary. Turning down an interview or job offer based solely on salary could send the message that you are inflexible.

The better option: Do a thorough evaluation of what the salary ranges are for the types of jobs you are interested in. This means speaking to peers, recruiters and using online salary calculators.


Source: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2014/08/06/10-newbie-job-seeker-fails
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HRS Bulgaria will take part in the 4th edition of Career Speed Dating with focus German language

Published on 22.04.2014

On the 23rd April 2014 HRS Bulgaria will take part in the 4th edition of Career Speed Dating with focus German language. The event is part of the project Back2bg.com by the foundation “Identity for Bulgaria”.


Speed Dating is an event organized for the first time in 1998 at Peet’s Café in Beverly Hills. Rapidly is gaining popularity around the world, and for already 3 years the event is organized in Bulgaria. Back2BG.com becomes a tool for professional realization. Every edition of Career Speed Dating has a specific focus. The focus of this edition is: German language!


The event will be attended by candidates, who are looking for career development and opportunity to practice their language skills in Bulgaria.


Our team will be glad to meet you in Hotel "EXPO", blvd. Tsarigradsko Shose 149, Sofia.


For more information visit www.back2bg.com!


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HRS Bulgaria will participate in the event "Mission Possible"

Published on 20.03.2014

On the 20th of March, 18.30 HRS Bulgaria will participate in the event “Mission Possible”, organized by AIESEC Sofia University.
The goal of the event is to meet the students with HR specialists from leading companies, who will share their professional point of view regarding the preparation, behaviors and expectations they have to their employees.
The students will have the opportunity to understand how to obtain the best from their work experience.
The HR specialist will share useful tips with students, who will have the opportunity to ask their questions regarding future possibilities.

The event will take place in the Mirror Hall in Sofia University.

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HRS Bulgaria will take part in Career Speed Dating on the 6th February 2014

Published on 27.01.2014

On the 6th of February 2014 HRS Bulgaria will take part in the 2nd edition of Career Speed Dating with focus French language. The event is part of the project Back2bg.com by the foundation “Identity for Bulgaria”.


Speed Dating is an event organized for the first time in 1998 at Peet’s Café in Beverly Hills. Rapidly is gaining popularity around the world, and for already 3 years the event is organized in Bulgaria. Back2BG.com becomes a tool for professional realization. Every edition of Career Speed Dating has a specific focus. The focus of this edition is: French language!


The event will be attended by candidates, who are looking for career development and opportunity to practice their language skills in Bulgaria.


Our team will be glad to meet you in Gallery Evropa, str. Lege 3, Sofia!


For more information visit www.back2bg.com!

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Value of 2013 outsourcing contracts slumps

Published on 23.01.2014

The total value of contracts agreed in the global outsourcing market in 2013 shrunk 18% compared to the previous year, according to new research from analysts.
Information Services Group (ISG) said that although the total number of outsourcing contracts awarded last year was 1,155 – up 2% on 2012 figures – it said the value of those contacts fell 18% to $18.7 billion in total. The figures, contained in the Global ISG Outsourcing Index (25-page / 2.46MB PDF), account for commercial outsourcing contracts that have an annual contract value of at least $5 million.
A reduction in the number of major outsourcing contracts worth at least $100m annually and a move towards "smaller deal sizes", together with the weak performance of the business process outsourcing (BPO) market and a decline in manufacturing activities were behind the slump, ISG said.
John Keppel, president of ISG, said the statistics were in line with predictions.
"On the surface, they show a fourth quarter that didn’t come in strong enough to salvage a disappointing first half, but from a longer-term perspective, they are broadly in line with pre-recession market levels,” Keppel said. "In this post-recessionary period, we are beginning to see changes in demand for sourcing.  Used principally as a tool for exploiting rapid cost-savings potential during the recessionary period, sourcing is now being used for strategic advantage as enterprises begin to move into growth modes."
A record 587 outsourcing contracts were agreed in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA) during 2013 and the total annual contract value from those deals was $10.2 billion. The value of restructured outsourcing contracts and IT outsourcing contracts in EMEA grew, but there was a slump in the value of all outsourcing contracts agreed in UK & Ireland. This was despite there being a 13% increase in the number of outsourcing contracts finalised in that market during the year, ISG said.
The reduction in total annual contract values for UK & Ireland outsourcing deals in 2013 could be attributed to a "lack of large BPO deals" in that market, it added.
ISG said that the 22% overall rise it had recorded in the number of outsourcing contract restructurings during 2013 highlighted the trend of businesses moving away from single suppliers to multi-sourcing arrangements. The number of IT outsourcing contracts finalised last year rose 8% across the globe although the annual value of those contracts declined 8% relative to 2012 figures, it said.
In Asia Pacific, the annual value of outsourcing contracts agreed in 2013 fell 40% from 2012 figures, which ISG described as "exceptionally strong". This was allied to a more than 10% drop in the number of outsourcing contracts agreed in the region last year compared to during the previous 12 months.

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Candidate managers see end to health fund's monopoly

Published on 11.07.2013

The two candidates to head Bulgaria's National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) criticized its monopoly and said they would work to encourage competition in the sector. That emerged during the hearing of Rumyana Todorova (nominated by the Socialist Party) and Dincho Genev (nominated by the Movement for Rights and Freedoms, MRF) in the parliamentary health committee. Their views came as a surprise, since previous candidates for the post have been against private competition.

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Unemployment in Bulgaria in Q1 2012 was 12.9% - National Statistics Institute

Published on 10.05.2012

Unemployment in Bulgaria in the first quarter of 2012 was 12.9 per cent, according to the National Statistics Institute.

A total of 422 500 people were jobless in Q1 2012, the statistics said, in a country of 7.3 million.

The institute said that in Q1 2012, the economically active population aged 15 to 64 was 3 234 600, representing 65.4 per cent of the population in the same age group.

Statistics released by European Union statistics office Eurostat on May 2 2012 said that in Bulgaria, the seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate in January was 12.2 per cent, in February 12.5 per cent and in March 12.6 per cent.

Youth unemployment - meaning people aged younger than 25 - in Bulgaria was 31.1 per cent in January, 32.3 per cent in February and 32.8 per cent in March, according to Eurostat.

Across the EU, in March 2012 unemployment was 10.2 per cent, Eurostat said. Across the EU, youth unemployment was 22.6 per cent in March 2012.

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Euro zone unemployment at record high

Published on 08.05.2012

Employment figures from the European Union show the jobless rate for countries using the euro has climbed to a 15-year high.

The Eurostat data agency reported Wednesday that unemployment reached 10.9 percent in March, up from 10.8 percent in February. The March figure translates to 17.4 million people unemployed in the eurozone.

Unemployment was the worst in Spain, at 24 percent, and in Greece, where the jobless rate was nearly 22 percent.

Nations with the lowest unemployment include Austria, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Germany, Europe's strongest economy. Unemployment in those nations ranged from 4 to 5.5 percent.

On Tuesday, May Day protesters across the European Union called for an end to austerity measures meant to deal with the flagging economy. They called instead for a new focus on job creation.

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